Jean George Boutilier

M, #63, b. 19 August 1691, d. 1752
FatherJean Guillaume Boutilier b. c 1642, d. 17 Jun 1712
MotherJeanne Mignerey d. 29 Nov 1725

Family

Sarah Grange b. c 1700, d. 1752
Children
  • Catherine Boutilier+ b. 7 Jan 1723/24, d. 26 Oct 1796
  • Nicholas Boutilier b. 26 Feb 1727/28, d. 10 Mar 1727/28
  • Jean George Boutilier b. 30 Jun 1729, d. 12 Mar 1784
  • Jean Nicholas Boutilier b. 22 Oct 1731, d. 16 Dec 1799
  • Pierre Boutilier b. 12 Jun 1734, d. 24 Jun 1734
  • Jacques Boutilier b. 4 Aug 1735, d. 27 May 1827
  • Jeanne Boutilier b. 15 Jul 1739
  • George Frederick Boutilier b. 3 Oct 1743
     Jean George Boutilier was born on 19 August 1691 at Etobon, Montbeliard.1,2 He was a joiner [finish carpenter] in 1700.1,2 He married Sarah Grange, daughter of Pierre Grange, on 19 January 1722/23 at Etobon, Montbeliard. He was 31.1,2 Jean George Boutilier and Sarah Grange and their children Jean Nicholas, Jacques, Jeanne and George Frederick left Europe on 30 May 1752 on board the Sally which arrived in Halifax in September, 1752. It appears that Jean George and Sarah died enroute. They were on board ship when it departed Rotterdam, but they were not entered on the first victualling lists at Halifax. Their young children Jeanne and Frederick were recorded as orphans.3 On the passenger list, Jean George Boutilier is described as 50 years old, from Montebliard, and a joiner. He was actually closer to 63 years old, and probably lied about his age to qualify for emmigration.3 The Protestants of Montbeliard emigrated to Nova Scotia partly to escape religious persecution. The passport issued to Jean George Boutilier gives strictly economic reasons for emigration, but that may have been necessary to avoid difficulty getting the passport.
     From First Generation4
4. Jean George Bouteillier Sr. - 24. Born 19 Aug 1691 in Etobon, Montbèliard. Christened 16 Aug 1692 in Etobon, Montbèliard. He married Sarah Grange 19 Jan 1723 in Etobon, Montbèliard. Died 1752 at sea/Lunenburg, N.S.

Biography: The British government entered into a contract in late 1749 with Mr. John Dick, a Rotterdam merchant, for the transportation of a certain number of Foreign Protestants to Nova Scotia. The British wanted settlers for Nova Scotia to counteract the French who were in Cape Breton at Fort Louisbourg. The British, who had founded Halifax in 1749, wanted settlers who would be loyal to the British Crown. They offered free land for the settlers in Nova Scotia.

"Immigration Permit"

"We, the governor, president, and councillers of the Regency established at Montbèliard for His Serene Highness, the Lord Duke of Witenberg reigning, etc., etc., declare to all whom these presents shall come, that the within named Jean George Bouteillier of Etoban, a village within the principality of Montbèliard, having informed us of his poverty and his inability to make in this country, a livelihood for himself and his family, composed of his wife and four children, has asked us permission to seek his fortune elsewhere, and the grant for this purpose of a passport for security of his voyage." "In consequence whereof, we the governor and council require all such as may be required to grant free passage to the said Bouteillier and his family, and to afford him all the help necessary for the carrying out of his voyage, under offer of reciprocity. In witness whereof, we have caused these presents to be sealed with the common seal, Seal of the Chancellery, and signed by a secretary of council this 5 April 1752." "By order, Dean Maire, Secy."
[This last line was written in after the document.]

English Translation of the "Passport of Jean George Bouteillier with his Wife and his four Children"

"Jean George S Bouteillier, of Etobon, in the principality of Montbèliard, who with his family composed of his wife and four children resolved to settle in New England under the rule of his Britannic Majesty with the consent of his own sovereign, having requested from the consistory of the said of Etobon, this certificate to be used by him in case of need, the undersigned cannot refuse this testimonial, whereby they declare that the said Bouteillier with his family has always professed the Protestant Evangelical religion according to the Augsburg Confession of Faith."

"They have moreover, always behaved as Christians having committed no crimes. Wherefore the undersigned take the liberty of requesting all those to whom they may apply to give them aid, and promising to reciprocate towards those who may be recommended to us." "Given at Etoban, the Seventh Day of April in the Year One Thousand Seven Hundred and Fifty Two."

"In Duny V. P. M."

The following statistics of the shipments in 1752 from Rotterdam to Halifax are of interest:
SHIP, DATE, NUMBER WHO LEFT, NUMBER WHO ARRIVED
Speedwell,16 May 1752,216, 203
Betty,16 May 1752,161, 154
Sally,30 May 1752,258, 218
Gale,5 June 1752,249, 220
Pearl,6 June 1752,251, 212

Jean George Bouteillier, Sr. was the senior family member on the "Sally". At the time of passage he gave his age as 50, however he was born in Etobon on 19 Aug 1691, making him 61 at the time. His godfather was Jean George Barot, represented by Christopher Blancon, and his godmother was Catherine Bouteillier, daughter of Lazare Bouteillier. It would appear he did not give his true age to ensure his acceptance for the voyage as Mr. Dick was recruiting younger men capable of doing hardwork in the new country.

The passenger list shows two females and two children carried as half freight accompanying Jean George. One of the females would have been his wife, Sarah Grange, who apparently died during the voyage. The second was likely his sister Catherine. The two youths were his children Jeanne (age 12) and Frederick (age 8). The passenger list of the "Sally" shows three other Boutiliers. The first two, Jean Nicholas and Jacques, are the two older children of Jean George. The third Boutilier on this list is another Jacques. It has been suggested that he was a brother to Jean George, Sr., and he is shown here as a brother. The "Sally" had a very lengthy and difficult voyage to Nova Scotia resulting in the high mortality rate (40 passengers died on the route). The voyage took about 14 weeks, longer than normal, as a result of encountering violent westerly gales. One of the passengers who died was the Captain. After arriving in Halifax harbor all of the passengers were held on board for another three weeks. Eventually they were disembarked and billeted in Halifax for the winter in hastily built board barracks. In the spring of 1753 the emigrants from the previous year were moved to Lunenburg. The research from Maggie Slauenwhite Boutilier, taken from that of Major F. M. Boutilier, reports that Jean George, Sr. married three times in Lunenburg and died in 1758. His wife at the time married Peter Conlon and in 1763 deeded their lot to G. F. Bailey.

The following information is from ships lists and victual lists that were found at the Beaton Institute, May, 1994. In the "Sally's" list the single Jacques comes in immediate succession to Jean Nicholas Bouteillier. Jacques signed the indebtedness list next to the other. Jean George and the two older women (his wife Sarah Grange and ?sister Catherine) apparently died on the voyage because they do not appear in the first victualling list of the "Sally's" passengers immediately after landing and it appears in the records that Jeanne, age 12, and Frederick, age 8, were now orphans. Their names appear of the first victualling list between the names of Jean Nicholas and Jacques.
Last Edited13 Feb 2014

Citations

  1. [S84] Karen Farmer, citing Chris Fretwell.
  2. [S80] Robert Kim Stevens, "Boutilier Family of Nova Scotia", April 11, 1999.
  3. [S314] Lunenburg County GenWeb, "Lunenburg Passenger Lists", June 19, 1999, Sally, 30 May 1752.
  4. [S189] Marc Boutilier, "First Generation."

Sarah Grange

F, #64, b. circa 1700, d. 1752
FatherPierre Grange

Family

Jean George Boutilier b. 19 Aug 1691, d. 1752
Children
  • Catherine Boutilier+ b. 7 Jan 1723/24, d. 26 Oct 1796
  • Nicholas Boutilier b. 26 Feb 1727/28, d. 10 Mar 1727/28
  • Jean George Boutilier b. 30 Jun 1729, d. 12 Mar 1784
  • Jean Nicholas Boutilier b. 22 Oct 1731, d. 16 Dec 1799
  • Pierre Boutilier b. 12 Jun 1734, d. 24 Jun 1734
  • Jacques Boutilier b. 4 Aug 1735, d. 27 May 1827
  • Jeanne Boutilier b. 15 Jul 1739
  • George Frederick Boutilier b. 3 Oct 1743
     Sarah Grange was born circa 1700 at Etobon, Montbeliard.1,2 She married Jean George Boutilier, son of Jean Guillaume Boutilier and Jeanne Mignerey, on 19 January 1722/23 at Etobon, Montbeliard. He was 31.1,2 Jean George Boutilier and Sarah Grange and their children Jean Nicholas, Jacques, Jeanne and George Frederick left Europe on 30 May 1752 on board the Sally which arrived in Halifax in September, 1752. It appears that Jean George and Sarah died enroute. They were on board ship when it departed Rotterdam, but they were not entered on the first victualling lists at Halifax. Their young children Jeanne and Frederick were recorded as orphans.3 She died in 1752 probably at sea enroute to Nova Scotia.1,2
Last Edited13 Feb 2014

Citations

  1. [S84] Karen Farmer, citing Chris Fretwell.
  2. [S80] Robert Kim Stevens, "Boutilier Family of Nova Scotia", April 11, 1999.
  3. [S314] Lunenburg County GenWeb, "Lunenburg Passenger Lists", June 19, 1999, Sally, 30 May 1752.

Jean Guillaume Boutilier

M, #72, b. circa 1642, d. 17 June 1712
FatherJean Nicholas Boutilier b. 1596
MotherUrsule Breuchot b. 1600, d. 1670

Family

Jeanne Mignerey d. 29 Nov 1725
Children
  • Jeanne Boutilier b. Aug 1671, d. 26 Nov 1755
  • Isaac Boutilier b. 30 Apr 1672, d. 20 Oct 1672
  • Pierre Boutilier b. Sep 1673
  • Catherine Boutilier2 b. 1675
  • Bonne Marie Boutilier b. 4 Aug 1678
  • Pierre Boutilier b. c 1680
  • Jean Boutilier b. 22 Oct 1682
  • Catherine Boutilier b. 16 Sep 1685
  • Jean George Boutilier+ b. 19 Aug 1691, d. 1752
     Jean Guillaume Boutilier was born circa 1642.1,2,3 He married Jeanne Mignerey on 23 August 1670 at Etobon, Montbeliard.1,2,3 Jean Guillaume Boutilier died on 17 June 1712 at Etobon, Montbeliard.1,2,3
Last Edited15 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S84] Karen Farmer, citing Chris Fretwell.
  2. [S80] Robert Kim Stevens, "Boutilier Family of Nova Scotia", April 11, 1999.
  3. [S81] Karen Farmer, citing Gail Facini.

Jeanne Mignerey

F, #73, d. 29 November 1725

Family

Jean Guillaume Boutilier b. c 1642, d. 17 Jun 1712
Children
  • Jeanne Boutilier b. Aug 1671, d. 26 Nov 1755
  • Isaac Boutilier b. 30 Apr 1672, d. 20 Oct 1672
  • Pierre Boutilier b. Sep 1673
  • Catherine Boutilier1 b. 1675
  • Bonne Marie Boutilier b. 4 Aug 1678
  • Pierre Boutilier b. c 1680
  • Jean Boutilier b. 22 Oct 1682
  • Catherine Boutilier b. 16 Sep 1685
  • Jean George Boutilier+ b. 19 Aug 1691, d. 1752
     Jeanne Mignerey was also known as Jeanne Mignerei.1 She married Jean Guillaume Boutilier, son of Jean Nicholas Boutilier and Ursule Breuchot, on 23 August 1670 at Etobon, Montbeliard.2,1,3 Jeanne Mignerey died on 29 November 1725 at Etobon, Montbeliard.1,3
Last Edited15 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S80] Robert Kim Stevens, "Boutilier Family of Nova Scotia", April 11, 1999.
  2. [S84] Karen Farmer, citing Chris Fretwell.
  3. [S81] Karen Farmer, citing Gail Facini.